3 Tips To Finding Story Conflict From “The Closer” – Sky Box Ticket Crazy

Photo by schwab

Photo by schwab

The year Kirby Puckett and the Minnesota Twins won the World Series, I joined the baseball crazed fans outside of the Metrodome to celebrate their success. Throngs of people screamed, shook Homer Hankies, even tipped over a van to show their elation.

I still have my Homer Hankie and Kirby Puckett rookie baseball card as memorabilia of that year.

Naturally, when I saw the episode of The Closer where Lieutenants Provenza and Flynn can’t miss the Big Game, I am totally empathetic. That is until I see how crazy it makes them. Then it just makes for great story conflict. Check it out:

3 Tips To Finding Story Conflict From The Closer:

1. Identify One of Your Hero/Heroine’s Important Goals.  Right at the very beginning of the clip Chief Brenda Johnson states that one of the key reasons she had been hired was to end this type of incident. This sets up the conflict to have punch.

2. Find Someone To Oppose That Goal. This can be an enemy, but it is often much more unpredictable and fun when it is someone well-intentioned. If it is a friend, then it causes conflicting goals sometimes, upping the conflict.

3. Complicate Things With Humanity. When you say, “Well, at least it can’t get any worse,” find a way to make it worse. In this case a dead body is in the garage and later it disappears. Provenza and Flynn make all kinds of mistakes that are aggravating and all too human.

Humanity can add so much conflict to life, not to mention fiction! Try these 3 Tips To Finding Story Conflict From The Closer the next time your manuscript is feeling flat.

For more tips on adding conflict to your novel, check out my book Idea Sparking: How to Brainstorm Conflict in Your Novel.

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2 thoughts on “3 Tips To Finding Story Conflict From “The Closer” – Sky Box Ticket Crazy

  1. Love this!! Will have to work it in my story.

  2. I loved this too. I’m trying to think about more ways to add in conflict with my new story. This is great, Michelle!

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